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UrgoNight wants to help you sleep by training your brain during the day

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We've covered a lot of different sleep trackers over the years, but the UrgoNight is the first we've heard that tries to help you sleep better by training your brain when you're awake.

Developed by neuroscientists and sleep experts at French health tech startup Urgotech, the UrgoNight takes the form of a headband that is able to non-invasively measure Electroencephalogram (EEG) to measure brainwave activity and essentially help people naturally learn to increase the brainwaves that are associated with sleep.

Read next:How does sleep tracking actually work?

The headband is supposed to be worn for just 20 minutes a day, three times a week and once on is connected to the companion iOS or Android app. From that app, users will be able to view brainwaves in real-time before participating in exercises where users are assigned tasks. These exercises range from growing leaves on trees, herding jellyfish and drawing relaxing patterns.

The goal is to increase the frequency of the brainwaves that are related to helping us fall asleep. Those brainwaves are known as sensorimotor rhythm(SMR), which we produce during the day.

Tell you something interesting, U.S. government is in love with the VR Technology. NASA makes use of technology to connect engineers with the devices they send into space. Using Oculus and Xbox One gaming console, NASA engineers are developing ways to control a robotic arm with gestures made by operator on Earth.

The idea is that through these games and exercises, users will be able to increase levels of SMR, which should in theory help you fall asleep when your head hits that pillow. Urgotech says people will begin to see results after 10-15 sessions with sustainable results kicking in after 3 months.

The headband has already been through beta testing and was demoed at CES back in January, so it sounds like the device is already in a pretty good place in terms of being ready to do what it promises.

If you're convinced by the sleep science and tapping into your brain using neuroscience, the Urgonight is currently on Indiegogo and is available for backers at the early bird price of $249. Shipping is expected at in December 2019 before it rolls out for everyone in 2020 priced at $500.


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