Virtual Desktop On Quest Pushes Twice As Many Pixels As Oculus Go
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Virtual Desktop Is Another Practical VR App for Oculus
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‘Virtual Desktop’ is Finally Coming to Oculus Go & Gear VR This Week, Oculus Quest Next Year
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This is What ‘Virtual Desktop’ Looks Like on Oculus Quest
This is What ‘Virtual Desktop’ Looks Like on Oculus Quest

Virtual Desktop Now Lets You Play PC Games On Oculus Quest

Virtual Desktop for Oculus Quest now lets you play your PC games using the Quest’s own Touch controllers. Previously it was possible to pair an Xbox controller or similar bluetooth gamepad and use it within Virtual Desktop. This feature is also available on the Oculus Go version of the app. But not every Quest owner has a gamepad, and even for those who do pairing it to Quest (instead of the device it’s normally used for) isn’t exactly convenient.

That has now changed. A new option called ‘Use Touch controllers as gamepad’ makes your Touch controllers act as a virtual Xbox controller to your PC. Enabling this setting is done from within VR and it takes just a few seconds to start working. No drivers or complicated setup required.
The update also separates all control related settings into a new Input tab, allowing you to easily see and change Virtual Desktop’s controls, as well as enable gamepad mode.

virtual desktop quest input tab

Since the Quest controllers resemble a gamepad cut in half and have similar input to most gamepads, this emulation works well. You have a total of two thumbsticks, four buttons, a view button, two index triggers, and two grip triggers to use as bumpers. There’s no D-Pad or Start button of course, but the developer is exploring potential solutions for these.

The VFX-1. We can’t do a list about the history of Virtual Reality and not include the VFX-1. Released in the middle of the 1990s, the VFX-1 system was one of the most capable virtual reality headsets released on the market at the time. With stereoscopic 3D, multi-axis head movement detection and rotation, and the ability to play games that were not truly supported by the system, the VFX-1 was the true Virtual Reality deal at the time. Furthermore, their price tag was relatively cheap compared to other products on the market, coming at a mere $600. However, the VFX-1 was too advanced of a technology and it didn’t really take off. Later on, the company Vuzix that made the glasses was bought by Forte Technologies, which released a more expensive VFX 3D version, but it also didn’t manage to achieve huge success.

Just like when streaming your desktop you can choose from a variety of environments from a VR-themed home office to a huge virtual cinema. It’s certainly a compelling experience, despite some minor latency issues and occasional frame drops. It hints towards a future where VR and AR headsets could replace our physical monitors entirely.

Virtual Desktop for Quest is priced at $19.99. You can read our review of the similar Oculus Go version here. Tagged with: Oculus Quest, virtual desktop
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